PRE-ORDER YOUR CHRISTMAS TURKEY!

We’re stocking incredible award winning free-range Bronze Turkeys from Starveall Farm in Buckinghamshire. Make your meal the envy of any guest this Christmas, from gammon & lamb, to amazing rare breed beef cuts & roasting joints.

Pre-oder before: 20th December | Collect before: 23rd December

Our butcher is now open and available to discuss your favourite cuts of meat. You can now enjoy all the benefits of buying local, directly from selected independent farmers where animal welfare and husbandry is paramount. We’re building a small & passionate team who will provide everything you need, whether it’s a family roasting joint or the dry aged sirloin. Complementing our high-quality produce is a selection of beautiful house-made products, including charcuterie, marinades, sauces, beer & wine.

Neck & Clod

The beef clod or shoulder is one of the cheapest cuts of beef and is taken from the shoulder region of the cattle. This is why it is sometimes called chuck or shoulder clod. Beef clod consists of a large muscle system and some fat that covers the muscles. Beef clod can be prepared in a variety of methods both dry and moist, but the most recommended method to cook beef clod is with moist heat or slow braising. Long slow smoking also provides great results.

Chuck & Blade

The typical chuck steak is a rectangular cut, about 1″ thick and containing parts of the shoulder bones. This cut is usually grilled; a thicker version is sold to roast” and is usually cooked with liquid, low and slow. The braising steak is one of the more economical cuts of beef. It is particularly popular for use as ground beef, due to its richness of flavor and balance of meat and fat.

Thick Rib

This is relatively priced beef cut and is slightly more tender that traditional braising. Thick rib will usually be cooked slow. This cut of beef is also well known by numerous other names including shoulder, top rib, and palace rib. The meat itself is cut away from near the neck, clod, chuck and blade; it is also located just above the brisket.

Thin Rib

Thin Rib of beef is often used for mincing, or for stewing steak. It is a fatty, tough cut which benefits from long, slow cooking with bold flavors. Can also benefit from being cooked the night before to further enhance the flavour.

Fore Rib

The fore rib, taken from the back of the animal behind the blade, is a medium-priced cut of beef. If is usually sold as a roasting joint and can be sold either on or off the bone. Off the bone, the joint is rolled and often stuffed. The fore rib makes a good and tender roasting joint when cooked slowly with the fat rendered out adding to flavour. The fore rib can also be sold as steaks.

Brisket

Brisket is a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest of beef. The brisket muscles include the superficial and deep pectorals. The resulting meat must be cooked correctly to tenderise the connective tissue as it’s normally a tough cut of meat, due to the collagen fibers that make up the significant connective tissue. It is tenderised after slow cooking when the collagen gelatinises. The fat cap, which is often left attached to the brisket, helps to keep the meat from drying out during long cooking periods. Baste well and often to give the meat flavour.

Sirloin & Tenderloin

Sirloin Steak comes from the same area as your Sunday roast, it’s a muscle that does little work, making the meat particularly tender. The steak is cut from the rear back portion of the animal, continuing off the short loin from which T-bone, porterhouse, and entrecote steaks are cut. These are prime cuts which are suitable for grilling, frying, and barbecuing.

The fillet is taken from the smaller end of the tenderloin, and the upper section of the sirloin. Prized for its tenderness it is harvested as two long snake-shaped cuts that are arguably the most tender and expensive, but also the least flavourful.

Rump

Rump steak is slightly cheaper than sirloin but it’s still a great steak for griddling or frying, with more flavour than sirloin. However, it does tend to be slightly chewier, especially if it has not been matured properly. It’s recommended to grill and slice before serving and is best enjoyed medium to rare.

Topside

Topside contains lean, moderately tough, lower fat cuts with distinctly less marbling. This can make topside dry out when cooked with dry-heat cooking like roasting or grilling. Topside cuts are commonly prepared with slow moist-heat methods including braising, to tenderse the meat and maintain moisture. The cut is often sliced thin, then dried or smoked at low temperature to make charcuterie.

Silverside

Silverside is a cut of beef from the hindquarter of cattle, just above the leg. It gets its name because of the ‘silver wall’ on the side of the cut; this is a long fibrous skin of connective tissue, which has to be removed as it is too tough to eat. Silverside is boned out from the top along with the topside and thick flank. It is usually prepared as a 2nd class roasting joint. It may also be thinly sliced for minute steak.

Thick Flank

Flank steak is a lean, somewhat tough but flavorful cut of beef that benefits from the tenderisng effects of a marinade. It is best cooked medium rare and thinly sliced at an angle across the grain of the meat.

Flank

Flank steak is a lean, somewhat tough but flavorful cut of beef that benefits from the tenderisng effects of a marinade. It is best cooked medium rare and thinly sliced at an angle across the grain of the meat.

Leg

The beef shank is the shank or leg portion of a steer or heifer. In Britain the corresponding cuts of beef are the shin and the leg. Due to the constant use of this muscle by the animal it tends to be tough, dry, and sinewy, so is best when cooked for a long time in moist heat. It is an ideal cut to use for beef bourguignon, or Beef Pho soups. As it is very lean, it is widely used to prepare very low-fat ground beef or beef stock.

Shin

The beef shank is the shank or leg portion of a steer or heifer. In Britain the corresponding cuts of beef are the shin and the leg. Due to the constant use of this muscle by the animal it tends to be tough, dry, and sinewy, so is best when cooked for a long time in moist heat. It is an ideal cut to use for beef bourguignon, or Beef Pho soups. As it is very lean, it is widely used to prepare very low-fat ground beef or beef stock.

Breast

The leanest and probably the most popular cut of the bird, can be purchased either with the skin on or off. Can be cooked numerous ways be careful not to overcook as can become dry.

Wings

The wings are supplied on the bone and have less meat on than other cuts but by no means less tasty.

Thighs

Often described as the tastiest park of the bird, they are from the top part of the leg. Very juicy and tender, the meat here is darker and therefore needs longer to cook.

Drumsticks

The lower part of the leg cheaper than breast meat and easy to cook as harder to overcook.

Shoulder

The whole shoulder is made up of the spare rib, blade and hand. This can be roasted as a whole on the bone and would be enough to feed a football team. It is excellent for slow roasting as the fat content means it does not easily dry out. A good joint for cooking overnight.

Loin

The classic joint that can be taken from the loin is the Rack of Pork, this is the first 8 ribs from the head end of the loin. This can also be divided into 3 smaller roasting joints, and in turn each of the 3 joints can be cut into chops.  Any of the loin joints can be deboned and rolled into a great joint for stuffing.  Back bacon is cured meat from the loin.

Belly

Belly is used cured to make streaky bacon.The cut can be used as a wonderful roast that can be cooked quickly or very slowly. If cooked correctly will give excellent crackling. This cut is also mixed with leaner meat to make a good sausage meat.

Leg

Legs of pork are normally cured and eaten as hams, a whole leg would produce a very large ham on the bone. Usually these days they are divided into two or three smaller hams. If not cured the corner fillet can be cut and dressed as pork leg steaks.

Neck/Scrag End

The bony part of the neck, which is cut across into thick slices. Flavoursome, can be filleted for stewing meat or alternatively can be cooked on the bone, they are great for slow cooking Irish stew and hot pots.

Best End

This consists of the first eight ribs and the lean meat between them and the backbone. These can be divided individually into cutlets or left as a the 8 ribs together this is known as a rack and are great for roasting.

Loin

Like the best end can either be left as one joint or cut into individual Loin chops. If left whole can be boned out and stuffed then rolled, tied and roasted or roasted as is with the ribs still in.

Shoulder

The shoulder offers plenty of tender meat but needs to be cooked longer and slower to render the fat down. The longer the cooking the more tasty this cut gets.

Breast

A cut which includes part of the belly is a fatty cut, best rolled with a dry stuffing to adsorb the excess fat and post roasted for a long time.

Chump

This cut comes from where the loin meets the leg, and can be divided to produce two chump chops and a small, roasting joint.

Leg

A whole leg of lamb can be cooked whole or can also be divided into two smaller roasting joints. If whole can either be roasted quickly and left pink or roasted more slowly so the meat is falling away from the bone. A ‘butterflied’ leg of lamb has simply been open-boned to leave one large piece of meat, shaped roughly like a butterfly.